The lower rate of incarceration (3% versus 9%) in the study among Oxford House versus usual care participants corresponded to annualized savings for the Oxford House sample of roughly $119,000. Together, the productivity and incarceration benefits yield an estimated $613,000 in savings accruing to the Oxford House participants. https://ecosoberhouse.com/ In this same study, we examined the combined effects of 12-step involvement and Oxford House residence on abstinence over a 24-month period (Groh, Jason & Ferrari, 2009). Among individuals with high 12-step involvement, the addition of Oxford House residence significantly increased the rates of abstinence (87.5% vs. 52.9%).

  • Try to determine their optimism, willingness to offer support and motivation for remaining sober.
  • Less than 4% of our sample with Hispanic, and this led us to examine possible reasons for this under-representation.
  • Some houses are all veterans but primarily veterans are integrated into the normal Oxford House population.
  • We also examine whether settings such as Oxford Houses have an impact on their greater community.

Oxford Houses cater to individuals in early recovery seeking a drug-free and safe environment that encourages personal responsibility and growth. Residents must abide by rules prohibiting alcohol or drug use, demonstrating financial responsibility, and participating in house management. Compared to other facilities, Oxford Houses are self-run and provide a structured, cost-effective option for maintaining sobriety with a supportive peer network. In general, individuals with a history of vagrancy, incarceration or inadequate social support are at high risk of relapse. But sober living homes can be beneficial for anyone in recovery who does not have a supportive, substance-free environment to go home to. Halfway houses are technically sober living environments, but there are many differences between halfway houses for people transitioning out of incarceration and sober homes for people in recovery from addiction.

Main Outcome Studies

Those who have benefited from an Oxford House have acquired enthusiasm for the Oxford House concept. In their enthusiasm, they have been anxious to share Oxford House with any recovering alcoholics and drug addicts who want to establish an Oxford House in their community. The charter of each Oxford House requires that an Oxford House meet certain minimum requirements of Oxford House, Inc. First of all, no Oxford House may permit individuals to remain as members if those individuals are drinking or using drugs.

oxford house sober living rules

Using this cost-effective way to improve the chances of recovery from addiction may be the best way to show the community that recovery works and that recovering addicts can become model citizens. Any recovering alcoholic or drug addict can apply to get into any Oxford House by filling out an application and being interviewed by the existing members of the House. The application is then considered by the membership of the House and if there is a vacancy and if 80% of the members approve, the applicant is accepted and moves in. If an applicant does not get voted into one house he or she should try another house in the area. The Oxford House website contains an application and information about How to Apply to live in an Oxford House. One can only be dismissed from an Oxford House because of drinking, using drugs, non-payment of rent, or disruptive behavior.

Q. What is the success rate for Oxford House residents?

Each Oxford House is an ordinary single-family house with two bathrooms and four or more bedrooms. Ideally several of the bedrooms are large enough for two twin beds so that newcomers, in particular, are able to have a roommate. This discourages isolation and helps the newcomer to learn or relearn socialization to get the full benefit of recovering individuals helping each other to become comfortable enough in sobriety to avoid relapse. A recovering individual can live in an Oxford House for as long as he or she does not drink alcohol, does not use drugs, and pays an equal share of the house expenses.

oxford house sober living rules

Results were quite positive; only 18.5% of the participants who left Oxford House during the course of the one-year study reported any substance use (Jason, Davis, Ferrari, & Anderson, 2007). Additionally, over the course of the study, increases were found in the percentage oxford house traditions of their social networks who were abstainers or in recovery. Finally, latent growth curve analyses indicated that less support for substance use by significant others and time in Oxford House predicted change in cumulative abstinence over the course of the study.

Support System and Meetings

Despite their initial concerns, participants reported overwhelmingly positive experiences in Oxford House, with the majority of interviewees indicating that they “blended into the house” within their first few weeks. Most participants reported regular contact with extended family members and stated that family members supported their decisions to live in Oxford House. The most commonly endorsed suggestion for increasing Hispanic/Latino representation in Oxford House was to provide more information regarding this innovative mutual-help program. Residents indicated that personal motivation for recovery was a necessary component of their success in Oxford House (Alvarez, Jason, Davis, Ferrari, & Olson, 2007). Additionally, mutual help, social support, a sober living environment, and accountability emerged as strongly-endorsed therapeutic elements of the Oxford House model. Oxford Houses are self-run, democratic sober living homes for individuals recovering from alcohol and drug addiction.

Living within an Oxford House provides both the opportunity and motivation for all residents to regularly attend AA and/or NA meetings. The example of Oxford House members going to AA or NA meetings on their own is contagious. It has been the experience of Oxford House that participation in AA and NA is extremely high in an environment where one individual can see another individual, with the same disease, reaping great benefits from AA and/or NA participation. Given the expanding federal deficit and obligations to fund social security, it is even more important for psychologists to consider inexpensive ways to remediate inequities within our society. The Oxford House model suggests that there are alternative social approaches that can transcend the polarities that threaten our nation (Jason, 1997). We believe that there is much potential in the Oxford House model for showing how intractable problems may be dealt with by actively involving the community.

Why Do People Choose to Live in an Oxford House?

They provide a balance of supervision and independence that allows people to transition back to work, school and daily life. An American Journal of Public Health study compared individuals who lived in a sober living home to those who only received outpatient treatment or attended self-help groups. Most residents find a job to pay out of pocket or set up a payment plan with the home. Some sober living homes are covered by private insurance, government funding or Medicaid.

  • Some homes are highly structured, with strict schedules and consistent eating and meeting times.
  • The homes may also be near an outpatient treatment center or on the campus of residential rehab facility.
  • That’s why the environment you move into must continue motivating you in recovery.12 When comparing sober living houses, determine how the staff and peers keep each other excited for sobriety.
  • Yet, needing a roof over your head isn’t the only reason to consider an Oxford House.
  • To support persons in recovery by improving their access to safe, stable residences with peer and community support.